Electroglide Contest Results

55 posts

Electroglide Report for May 2019

It was looking like we were going to have a terrific Electroglide this month. The weather consisted of clear skies, warming air and little wind. Nothing resembling the early predictions from Lindbergh Field. Scott Vance, young Neil Yieh Zhu and I had our gliders up about a half hour before the 10:00 start time. The lift was not hard to find.

Abundant lift was anywhere north of our runway, all you needed was about 150 – 200 feet of altitude. Scott and I noticed that even with moderate down stick applied, our Radians continued to go up. I watched Neil put his glider in a tight left turn and with wings banked, the glider maintained its altitude. This was looking like fun!

The 10:00 o’clock start time soon arrived along with, some western wind. Seven pilots sent their aircraft aloft, looking for that thermal lift and it was gone. With lift now disrupted, Scott Vance had the longest flight at 3:30 minutes with a 20-point bonus landing. Bob Anson came in second at 2:53 aloft, also with a 20-point landing. Dennis La Berge was third at 2:30 and a 10-point landing. Eric Byrd and Neil both picked up 20-point landings

This was looking depressing; the wind had blown away that great lift.

Second launch took place two minutes after Scott retrieved his Radian from the runway. Seven pilots again took to the skies with a slight change in the wind strength. Five pilots found the lift and with careful piloting were able to get long flights. Bob had the longest flight at 9:30 minutes. Eric came in second at 8:54 and Scott was third at 8:50 aloft with a landing bonus of 20-points. Dennis picked up a 30-point landing. Alex Sutton had a 20-point landing. Neil and Stephen Treger both had 10-point landings. This was looking much better.

Third launch now had eight pilots trying their best and the lift had vanished again. Scott had the long flight at 3:35 plus a 30-point landing. Second longest flight was from Eric at 2:30, also scoring a 30-point landing. Bob came in third at 2:26 aloft. Dennis picked up a 30-point landing and I picked up a 10-point landing.

Fourth and final launch was into pretty much the same conditions. Vince Gonsowski had the long flight at 5:00 minutes with a 30-point landing. Bob and Scott both flight times at 3:30, Scott getting a 20-point landing. I came in third at 3:07 with a 10-point landing. Neil picked up a 30-point landing, Dennis and Stephen both had 20-point landings.

Good flying to all involved in the Electroglide. The weather was frustrating, but pilots made the best of it. Kudos also to all who continue to score the bonus landing points. It’s a hard thing to do, placing your aircraft in the target circles so often.

Thanks again to Frank Sutton for the great pictures of the event.

Next Electroglide is set for June 15th at 10:00 a.m.

See you there,

Jeff

Electroglide Report for April 2019

Electroglide Report for April 20th, 2019

We had one fun Electroglide this month, beautiful weather and plenty of lift. The predicted weather was supposed to be partly cloudy with a south west wind of 12 mph and 67 degrees. What we had was partly cloudy with north west winds at 7 mph and enough sunlight shinning to create wonderful thermals.

At around 9:40 a.m., Dennis La Berge had his Radian up looking for potential lift. He found it just under 100 feet altitude and slightly north of our runway. The sun had been shining for a time, the winds were very light, so the thermal must have been generated by all the vegetation at our flying area. Hey, go green.

First launch was at 10 a.m. and ten aircraft took to the skies. Most of us headed to the western edge of our flight area. We didn’t have to search long as we quickly found solid lift. At least eight aircraft were working a very broad lift when a full-sized helicopter came roaring through from the west. We all had to drop altitude quickly and it was decided to restart the first launch.

The wind had started to pick up, and by the time we relaunched, the lift was no longer in the same spot.

Arthur Markiewicz had the long flight of four minutes plus a 20-point landing. Scott Vance came in second for that launch at 3:46 with a 10-point landing and Dennis La Berge had a flight of 3:17 plus a 30-point landing. I managed a 20-point landing and Alex Sutton picked up a 10-point landing.

Second launch happened two minutes after Arthur’s Radian touched down and the lift had returned. Flight times jumped with the longest recorded by Arthur at 9:36 with a 20-point landing. Next was Stephen Treger at 9:30 plus a 30-point landing and coming in third was Scott at 9:12 and a 20-point landing. Dennis also picked up a 20-point landing.

Third launch had only Arthur finding the lift with a flight time of 9:13 and a 20-point landing. Scott had the second longest flight at 4:54 with a 10-point landing and Dennis came in third at 4:41 with a 20-point landing.

Forth and final launch was much more fun with five gliders staying aloft beyond nine minutes. Arthur had the long flight at 9:50 and a 30-point landing. New to Electroglide, Eric Byrd had a very good flight of 9:48 plus a 30-point landing and Alex Sutton had a flight of 9:43 minutes with a 20-point landing. Dennis picked up a 30-point landing and Scott had a 10-point landing.

The weather gave us great flying conditions that was enjoyed by all. Landing conditions however were a bit tricky, so it was nice to see many pilots scoring extra points by landing in the target circles.

Thanks to Frank Sutton for providing wonderful pictures of the event.

Next Electroglide is scheduled for May 18th 10 a.m. first launch.

See you there,

Jeff

Electroglide Report for March 2019

By Jeff Struthers

The Electroglide Competition has returned after two months of rain delays. The weather gave us a beautiful blue-sky weekend. Wind was nonexistent at the 10:00 a.m. start, when 10 pilots launched into the pretty San Diego morning.

The lift was hard to find on that first launch, perhaps because of the lack of any wind. Arthur Markie, who just joined the Electroglide Competition this year, had the longest flight at 6:15 minutes and picked up a 20-point bonus landing. Scott Vance had a good flight at 5:15 minutes, also getting a 20-point landing. The rest of us had flights in the three- and two-minute range. Alex Sutton picked up a 20-point landing, George Sullivan and Dennis LaBerge both got 10-point landings. Continue reading

Electroglide Report for October 2018

By Jeff Struthers

It was a beautiful fall Saturday when we held the Last Electroglide for this year. The Santa Ana was still hanging around, 17% humidity, 81 degrees and a breeze from the west. That created some good lift conditions coming off Sea Worlds parking lot.

I took sick shortly before first launch. Club President Jim Bonnardel kindly took over giving pilots an entertaining banter while competing.

First launch had six pilots up and headed west. Scott Vance and Alex Sutton found the lift at the far western edge of our flight area. Alex had a flight time of 9:25 with a 20-point landing and Scott had a flight of 9:11 with a 10-point landing. Fred Daugherty, an experienced glider pilot, had the third longest flight time at 2:36. That hints of a tricky or tight column of lifting air.

Second launch had all pilots trying for the western lift spot again. Alex, Fred and Scott found a tight column and were working it well when an approaching full-size helicopter was spotted. Jim warned and then had to call all pilots back to our field. That created a “do over”. Jim reset the event clock and pilots relaunched with our flight area now clear. Alex Fred and Scott found the lift again and worked it well. Alex came back at 9:33 with another 20-point landing. Fred came back at 9:23 and Scott had a 9:15 aloft with a 20-point landing. Stephen Treger also picked up a 20-point landing.

Third launch was much shorter with flight times. The tight lift columns seemed to have disappeared. Scott had the long one at 2:35 with a 20-point landing. Alex and Fred both had times at 1:45, Fred picking up a 20-point landing. Stephen also getting another 20-point landing.

Forth launch also had short times. Scott had a 2:50 aloft with a 20-point landing. Alex had a 2:21 with a 30-point landing and Stephen had a 2:03 with a 30-point landing.

All told it was a nice way to finish up our 2018 season. I wish I was well enough to fly, the long flights in the first two rounds looked fun.

Scott Vance led the day in total points at 216. Alex Sutton came in second at 211 points and Fred Daugherty was third at 136 points.

Thanks to Frank Sutton for the pictures of this event.

The trophy awards and raffle prizes for the year will be awarded to Electroglide pilots at our next club meeting on October 27th.

See you there,

Jeff

More great Pics from Frank Sutton here.

 

Electroglide Report for September 2018

By Jeff Struthers

It was a fun Electroglide this past Saturday morning. Blue skies, a mild WNW breeze of 8 mph, and an air temperature of 77 degrees.

On first launch seven pilots took to the skies shortly after 10:00 a.m. We all tried to find the lift, two of us found it in the NW area of our field. Flight times really stretched out with my time aloft at 9:24. Second longest aloft was Alex Sutton at 9:04 with a 30-point landing. Third place for that round went to Carlos Mercado at 3:28 with a 20-point landing.

The second launch had us all heading to the NW section of our flight area. Scott Vance got the long flight at 8:58 with a 20-point landing. I came in second with a flight of 8:49 and a 20-point landing. Alex came in third at 5:21 with a 20-point landing.

Third launch had us all in the NW corner again finding that great lift, when the police helicopter turned and started to cross our flight area. Word was immediately shouted to all and we pushed sticks forward, diving for the runway. The flight area was cleared very quickly, we retrieved our aircrafts, waited a few minutes, then reset the time clock and launched again.

This launch was into a slightly stronger wind and it was disturbing the lift we had recently enjoyed. Longest flight went to Scott at 7:28 with a 20-point landing. Alex came in second at 5:35 with a 30-point landing and I came in third at 5:04 with a 30-point landing.

Forth and final launch had us in the lift again. The NW section was working great with flight times in the 9- and 8-minute range. The longest time aloft was earned by Scott at 9:27 with a 30-point landing. I came in just before him at 9:05 with a 30-point landing and Fred Daugherty had 8:36 aloft.

A very fun day with solid lift coming our way. Many pilots scoring bonus landing points added to the high scores. This makes for great competition and the skill shown by all pilots in working the lift and lining up their landings correctly made for great day.

Thanks again to Frank Sutton for being our photographer.

The next Electroglide will happen on October 20th. First launch is at 10:00 a.m.

See you then,

Jeff

Electroglide Report for August 2018

By Jeff Struthers

So how about a June Gloom in August? That’s pretty much what we had last Saturday morning. At 10:00 a.m., Lindbergh Field was reporting 3 mph variable winds and a 3000 ft cloud base.

Nine pilots showed up to brave the cloudy skies and at the first launch at 10:00 we all headed WNW in search of lift. It was very hard to find, and flight times were short. I had the longest at 4:17, Alex Sutton was next at 3:19 and Scott Vance had a 3:15 aloft. Scott, Bob Stinson and Fred Daugherty all picked up 20-point landings.

Second launch saw some better flight times with Scott getting the long flight at 7:40 plus a 30-point landing. Bob came in second at 5:08 and Alex had a 4:32 flight time plus a 20-point landing. Dennis La Berge also picked up a 30-point landing. I, Fred, George Sullivan, Alex and Mark Anderson all picked up 20-point landings.

For the third launch, many of us found the lift in our NW flight area. Fred had the longest flight at 9:40 with Scott coming a close second at 9:36 wit a 20-point landing. Bob had the third longest flight at 9:27 plus a 30-point landing. Dennis and I also picked up 30-point landings. George and Mark picked up 20-point landings as well.

One distressing part of that third launch was that a full-scale biplane flew through our flight area. It was a quick mover, looked like a small stunt aircraft and was flying east to west. None of us saw it coming, engine noise sounded like a motorcycle traveling along Sea World Drive. Before we could react, the biplane was about 200 feet above our gliders.

We will be placing a dedicated watcher to warn us all if another aircraft approaches the flight area.

Third and final launch was a bit of a dud. That wonderful lift that was there for the third launch was gone and flight times suffered. The longest flight was earned by Mark at 4:40 with a 20-point landing. Bob had the second longest at 3:08 and Alex came in at 3:01. Mark and I picked up 20-point landings and Scott picked up a 10-point landing.

Point total winners for the day were Scott Vance at 221. Bob Stinson was second place at 176. Dennis LaBerge and I tied for third with 159 apiece.

A tricky day for flying gliders but many pilots earned extra points by landing in the target circles. Good work guys.

A special thanks goes out to club member Frank Sutton for the enclosed pictures

The next Electroglide is set for September 15th at 10:00.

See you there,

Jeff

 

Electroglide Report for July 2018

By Jeff Struthers,

The Electroglide this month happened in clear but windy conditions. There were high thin clouds painted on blue skies over Mission Bay. At 10:00 a.m., Lindbergh Field was reporting westerly winds of 12 mph and visibility of 10 miles.

Several pilots flew their gliders before the contest start time, checking on the lift conditions. Some lift could be found high up, just south of the boat launch area. There were seven pilots ready to brave the winds at the 10:00 a.m. start time. Six Radians and one open class glider.

First launch had most of us heading WNW to the expected lift area. Only Scott Vance and Bob Stinson found good lift. Scott came back at 6:01, also getting a 20-point landing. Bob came in at 5:51 and I came in at 4:13, also placing a 20-point landing. Fred Daugherty picked up a 20-point landing and Carlos Mercado picked up a 10-point landing.

Second launch seemed to be in a bit stronger wind. This must have disrupted the thermal patterns because flight times dropped. Scott again had the longest flight at 4:01, also adding a 10-point landing to his flight score. Carlos had the next longest flight at 4:00 but greatly added to that with a 30-point landing. Bob was third in that launch, coming back at 3:46 with a 10-point landing. Bonus landing points were also earned by Fred, Stephen Treger and myself at 20-points; George Sullivan earned a 10-point landing.

On the third launch I succeeded in lousing my airplane, recovering only when Jim Bonnardel alerted us that a Radian was flying near the FPV area and all of us pilots were looking towards Sea World. It was mine I’m sorry to say. I must quit flying someone else’s airplane and pay attention to my own. I had just enough altitude left to make it to the runway and score the Lucky Dog award, a whopping 12-points for me on that round.

Most everyone had a flight of five minutes or less, but Bob Stinson and George Sullivan managed to stay in the air by working the lift over the Palm trees near the boat launch area. Bob had a flight time of 9:30 and George had a time of 9:26. Nice work of flying and reading their aircraft.

Landing in the increasing wind was difficult as all aircraft were coming back without motor power. With the wind from the rear, this made the rudder and elevator response sluggish. The final turn into wind and landing took up a lot of airspace. Bob and George did make the runway but landed east of the target circles. Carlos had the third longest time of 5:06. Scott and Stephen were the only ones to get bonus landing points, 20 and 10-points respectively.

The fourth and final launch found the wind disrupting any thermals. Scott had the longest flight, coming back at 5:49. Next was Fred at 4:41 with a 10-point landing. George was third at 3:26. Fred being the only pilot to score a bonus landing credit for that final round. Two pilots couldn’t get back to the field because of the wind and thus scored no points.

Total point winner for the day was Scott Vance with 177-points. Second place was Fred Daugherty at 133-points and third place was Bob Stinson at 126-points.

Flying a glider in strong winds with only 20 seconds of motor run time is a hard thing to do. Congratulations to all the pilots that picked up bonus landing points, that was hard as well.     Challenges like this make us all better pilots.

Next Electroglide is scheduled for August 18th. 10:00 a.m. is first launch.

See you there,

Jeff

 

Electroglide Report for June 2018

By Jeff Struthers

This was one tough Electroglide last Saturday. Lindbergh field was reporting South West winds of 10 mph with overcast skies at 10:00 a.m. Temperature was around 64 degrees. Perhaps this is the reason some Electroglide pilots decided to stay home. Four eager pilots did come out with their Radians and the contest began shortly after 10:00 a.m.

First launch was against a strong South wind, so we all decided to launch from the Northern edge of our runway. This worked well, but there was little lift to be found on this round. Landings proved to be the real challenge though. Of the four aircraft launched, only Alex Sutton managed to land back on the runway. All others came down in the weeds north of the runway. I don’t know what the flight times were for the off-field landings because no scores are awarded. Alex’s time was 2:47 and being the first (and only) pilot landing on the runway, I’m giving him the Lucky Dog Award. His flight time was worth 17-points but with the Lucky Dog it gets doubled to 34-points. He also managed a bonus landing of 20-points so that round gave him a respectable 54-points. Nice job Alex!

Second launch was again from the North edge of our runway. Flight times improved with pilots now learning how to work the wind lift. Fred Daugherty had the long flight but came up inches short of the runway’s north edge so no score. Alex had the next longest flight coming back to the field at 4:55. Carlos Mercado came in at 4:03 and picked up a 20-point landing.

Third launch, again into the South wind yielded short flight times. Alex had the longest flight at 2:18, Carlos came in next at 2:12.

Forth and final launch was again a quick one. Alex had the longest flight at 2:41 plus a 10-point landing. Fred had a flight of 2:10 and a 10-point landing. Carlos was aloft for 2:00 getting the Lucky Dog award and picking up a 20-point landing.

Winner for the day is Alex Sutton with 125 total points. Second place is Carlos Mercado at 113 points and Fred Daugherty came in third.

Like I mentioned in the start of this report, the weather conditions made flying a glider difficult. Landings are done without power for this contest. This forces the pilots to judge sink rate, altitude and how well their aircraft will penetrate the cross wind in attempting to make a field landing. A tricky thing.

It’s great to see these pilots adjusting to the given conditions and making a field landing, plus hitting the odd target circle for extra points. This is how we become better pilots. By flying in less than ideal conditions, adapting and learning in the process.

Thanks to Frank Sutton for the pictures.

The next Electroglide is set for July 21st, first launch is 10:00 a.m. Maybe we’ll have clear skies, Sea World thermals and a light westerly breeze.

See you there,

Jeff

Electroglide Report for May 2018

By Jeff Struthers

A May Gray day it was last Saturday. Winds blowing from the south at 5 mph for the 10:00 a.m. start.

First launch had Nine pilots taking to the sky, seven Radians, one Easy Star and one open class glider. The lift was there, up high towards the north west. It took a near vertical climb out on launch to get high enough to where the lift was, only Alex Sutton, Steve Gobel and myself got lucky and found it.

Alex had the long flight at 6:40 minutes with a 10-point bonus landing. I had a 6:37 flight and Steve had a flight of 4:45 minutes with a 30-point landing.

Other bonus landing credits earned were by Fred Daugherty for 10-points. Jon Graber and Carlos Mercado both earned 20-point landings on that first round.

Second launch two minutes later found no lift. We all tried the same spot in the sky to no avail. My flight was the longest at 3:32 minutes, Alex Sutton came down at 3:20 and Steve Gobel had 2:40 minutes aloft. Strange that just two minutes after concluding that first launch, such a change in weather conditions can occur.

Extra points earned through spot landings are a way to adjust to the lack of lift and that second launch had one 30-point landing, myself. Two 20-point landings, Alex and Fred, and three 10-point landings earned by Steve, Stephen Treger and Carlos.

Third launch found a slight improvement in conditions. Fred and Rich Rogers had the longest flight time of 4 minutes, 19 seconds each. Two 20-point landings were earned by Stephen and Jon, and Alex picked up another 10-point landing.

Forth and final launch had flight times increasing a bit more. Fred had the long flight at 5:42, and Carlos a close second at 5:29. Alex came in third with a 4:55 minutes aloft. Bonus landing credits were earned by many. I earned a 30-point landing. Steve, Fred, Stephen and Carlos all earned 20-point landings, and Rich Rogers picked up a 10-point landing.

It was great to see so many pilots landing in the target circles and earning bonus points. Paying attention to sink rate, estimating wind speed before making that final turn and having the correct altitude to land where they needed to. All without a motor to help, it’s a hard thing to do. So, congrats to everyone that day for flying so well.

Winner for the day was myself at 173 total points. Second place was Steve Goebel at 163-points and third place goes to Alex Sutton at 153-points.

Thanks again to Frank Sutton for the Electroglide pictures.

Next Electroglide is set for Saturday, June 16th. First launch is 10:00 a.m.

See you there,

Jeff

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Electroglide Report for April 2018

By Jeff Struthers

Last Saturday was one beautiful day for our Electroglide. Clear skies, 71 degrees and a NW wind. The wind would later increase and be a slight problem for us, but long flights were still made by some. Sam Halderman from the Escondido Wing Masters R.C. Club drove down and joined us for the contest.

First launch was at 10:00 and nine pilots took to the blue skies. Six Radians, one Easystar and one open class motor glider. I managed to get the first long flight at 7 minutes, 10 seconds. Alex Sutton came in second at 6:18, Rich Rogers was third with a flight of 5:26 plus getting a 20-point landing. Dennis LaBerge also picked up a 20-point landing. Steve Treger and Sam Halderman both got 10-point landings.

The second launch was into some increasing north west wind that affected the thermals coming towards us from Sea World’s parking lot, so flight times were a bit shorter. Jim Bonnardel had the long flight of 5:20 plus a 30-point landing. I came in second at 4:51 with a 20-point landing and Dennis La Berge was third at 4:10 minutes aloft. Sam Halderman again got a 10-point landing.

The third launch was into some tricky conditions. It took careful attention in watching our aircraft to stay aloft. Most flight times were under 5 minutes, but Jim Bonnardel showed us how to do it with an amazing flight time of 10 minutes and scoring a 20-point landing. I came in second with a 5:16 flight time and a 10-point landing. Sam Halderman came in third at 4:09 and another 10-point landing. Good flying Jim.

The forth and final launch had many of us finding the lift, flight times jumped. I managed the long flight at 8:58. Carlos Mercado came in second at 8:22 plus a 10-point landing and Dennis LaBerge and Alex Sutton shared third place with 6:36 aloft. Dennis picked up a 30-point landing. Stephen Treger and Jon Graber both scored 20-point landings. I would also like to point out that Jon Graber found a good thermal with his little EasyStar-2, staying aloft for respectable 6:20; his longest flight this year.

The winner for the day was yours truly with a total score of 199. Jim Bonnardel came in second at 170 points and Dennis LaBerge was third at 162 points.

This was a good contest on a beautiful day. Good flying by all pilots and many extra points earned with the spot landings. Great work everybody

Also, thanks again to Frank Sutton for all these pictures.

Next Electroglide is set for May 19th, 10:00 a.m. first launch.

See you then,

Jeff

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Electroglide Results for March 2018

By Jeff Struthers

Dang! This was brutal, and as one pilot remarked, eleven went out and six returned. I know this sounds like a comment from a war movie, yet the Electroglide contest was a battle. A battle against the elements.

Flying conditions started out as a foggy overcast morning, with the sky starting to clear at 9:30 a.m. A little before 10:00, Scott Vance got his glider up which has a reporting altimeter. He reported that the cloud cover began at 500 feet. So, the first launch proceeded at 10:00 a.m. with eleven gliders going up.

Flight times on that first launch were on the short side, with Bob Stinson getting the longest at 5 minutes 26 seconds plus a 30-point landing. Dennis LaBerge had the next flight time at 4:24 with a 20-point landing. My flight came third at 3:43 with a 20-point landing. Elias Treger and Carlos Mercado both picked up 20-point landings and Alex Sutton scored a 10-point landing.

In the short time between the end of the first round and the second launch, the weather turned against us. The wind changed from a 5 mph South West to a North West 8 mph breeze. Perhaps, this is what caused the cloud cover to drop to around 200 ft. Within 10 seconds of our allowed motor run, our aircraft were disappearing into the cloud cover.

We have all been there, when we were learning how to fly; a momentary loss of sighting of our airplane. We usually recovered sighting after a few seconds and the lesson was learned. Now imagine almost all the aircraft in that second launch disappearing into the clouds. It was like a collective gasp going through us.

My Radian was lost from sight. I cut power and pushed a little down elevator, still no sighting. I released the elevator and added a light left rudder and waited; still no sighting. I released rudder and added down elevator again, still no airplane. This is getting scary! I quit looking where I thought the aircraft should be and scanned a wider area and there it was, heading straight down just above the palm trees along the walking path. I barely recovered before it became a lawn dart. (Have a look at the attached picture called Jeff’s Dart.)

For those pilots who kept clear of the cloud cover or successfully got out of it, the flight times were great. The longest was Fred Daugherty at 9:07minutes. Second was Bob Stinson at 9:00, then Dennis LaBerge at 8:30 with a 20-point landing. The next flight time after Dennis was Stephen Treger at 2:40. His son had a flight time of 38 seconds but picked up the only other bonus landing of 10-points plus the Lucky Dog award.   My low altitude recovery gave me a flight time of 49 seconds. Going over the collected score sheets, it looks like we lost four aircraft on that second launch. Brutal!

Third launch had the remaining pilots staying well below the cloud cover so flight times reflected the loss of finding good lift. Fred Daugherty again had the long flight of 2:44 plus a 10-point landing. Bob Stinson had a flight of 2:35 with a 20-point landing and Dennis Laberge had a flight of 2:30 plus a 20-point landing. Alex Sutton, now flying a UMX Radian, had a 30-point landing. Stephen Treger and myself had 20-point landings and Elias Treger picked up a 10-point landing.

Forth and final launch again had short flight times. I had the long flight at 3:11 with a 20-point landing. Dennis LaBerge had a 3:05 with a 20-point landing and Bob Stinson had a flight of 3:00 with a 30-point landing. Fred Daugherty and Stephen Treger both had 20-point landings. Elias Treger again picked up a 10-point landing.

The winner for the day was Bob Stinson with a total point score of 204. Second place went to Dennis LaBerge at 202 and third place was Fred Daugherty at 115 points.

There was some good flying on the third and fourth rounds. Even with the wind, low cloud cover, and short flight times, many pilots were able to gain extra points with the landing bonus credits.

It’s a shame four aircraft crashed during the contest, but the remaining pilots adapted to the weather conditions and flew quite well.

Enjoy these pictures courtesy of Frank Sutton, thanks Frank.

Next Electroglide is scheduled for April 21st. First launch is at 10:00 a.m.

See you there,

Jeff

 

Electroglide Report for February 2018

By Jeff Struthers

We had a fun Electroglide last Saturday. I don’t think we could have had a better San Diego day. Lindbergh field’s 10:00 a.m. report shows 67 degrees, calm winds, partly cloudy skies with 10-mile visibility.

Eight pilots showed up, one Easy Star, one open class and six Radians took to the sky a little after 10:00.

First launch had us all looking for the lift. Flight times were modest. Dennis La Bergh had the long flight of 8:30, the rest of us were coming down in the mid 4 minutes. Jim Bonnardel and Electroglide newcomer Carlos Mercado both had 20-point landings, Jon Graber had a 10-point landing.

Second launch had conditions changing, a lot! Flight times jumped with five pilots flying beyond 8 minutes. Jim Bonnardel flew the longest for a 9:55 aloft. Roger Ball had a 9:46 and Scott Vance had 9:23 aloft. I got lucky with a 30-point landing. Scott had a 20-point with Jim, Roger and Carlos all getting 10-point landings.

Third launch again yielded some long flights. I had a flight of 9:43 and Roger Ball came in two seconds after me at 9:41. Tom Erickson coming back to the field at 9:17. Tom, Dennis and myself picked up 20-point landings. Jim, Roger and Scott Vance scored 10-point landings. Some good lift on the second and third launches.

The NW wind was picking up for the forth and final launch and made finding the lift a harder thing to do. Scott found some ridge lift near the palm trees in our NW flying area, gently working out the long flight of 8:28. Jim had an 8:02 flight and Dennis had a flight of 8:00. Jim, Scott, Dennis and myself picked up 20-point landings.

Top score for the day was Jim Bonnardel flying in the open class with 250 points. I was flying a Radian and got lucky with my extra point landings bringing me in second at 247 points. Scott Vance came in third at 237 points. Dennis LaBerge was fourth at 227 points. Both flying with Radians.

It was a great day to fly gliders in San Diego. Sunshine, Blue skies, high scattered clouds and thermals. The 10:00 start time is working out well, so we’ll do it again next month on March 17th.

See you then,

Jeff

Dennis coming back

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Electroglide Report for Jan 2018

By Jeff Struthers

It was a cool and windy start for the Electroglide Contest for 2018. Lindbergh Field was reporting a temperature of 61 degrees, but the WNW wind of 16 mph made it seem colder. Nine pilots braved the conditions and it proved to be a fun time.

First launch had us pushing into a strong headwind that limited gaining a high altitude. If we applied a soft hand on the controls, our aircraft would remain in place, held aloft by wind lift. Flight times were still short. I got lucky with a flight time of 4:52, Scott Vance had a time of 4:18 and Roger Ball had 3:52 aloft. I picked up a 20-point landing and Stephen Treger got a 10-point landing. Because of ground turbulence caused by the wind, extra point landings were hard. Sometimes just making to our runway was difficult.

Second launch found some of us figuring out how to fly in the wind and find a few updrafts. Alex Sutton had a nice flight lasting 6:59 and scoring an extra 10-points on landing. Scott Vance also did well with a 5:56 time and a 20-point landing. Dennis LaBerge came in third with a 4:36 and a 20-point landing. Ken Dresser and myself had 10-point landings.

The third launch proved to be a tough one. Roger Ball’s Radian aircraft lost its rudder due to a mid-air and the rest of us faced a stronger wind with no updrafts. The longest flight was recorded by Dennis at 3:26. I was next at 3:20 and Scott came down at 3:05. I managed to get a 30-point landing, Scott picked up a 20-point and Stephen and Ken each got a 10-point landing.

On the fourth and final launch we had an improvement with the weather. Flight times jumped with Scott coming back down at 6:35. Alex had a 5:22 and I had 5:00 minutes aloft. Ken had a great landing worth 30-points, Stephen and Elias Treger both had 20-point landings. Elias doing that with a wheeled glider, pretty cool. Alex and Dennis both had 10-point landings.

Winner for the day? Scott Vance and I tied for first place with 161 points each. Young Alex Sutton came in second with 135 points. Dennis LaBerge was third at 109 points.

It was impressive to watch how well everyone flew their airplanes in those windy turbulent conditions. Look at the contest pictures taken by Frank Sutton and notice our wind sock in the picture labeled “Up and Away2”.

Some practice time in the air and a light touch on the control sticks are all that is required to have some fun, competitive flying.

Come out and join us for the next Electroglide on February 17th at 10:00 a.m.

Until then,

Jeff

 

Very close landing

Electroglide Report for August 2017

By Scott Vance

 

This month’s Electroglide found us flying in overcast skies and light wind from the west with a temperature of 70 degrees. No one was expecting any lift in the usual spots, boy were we all surprised.

 

First launch at 09:30 found 6 Radians and one Easy Star climbing out to the west. To our great surprise, 3 pilots found lift and plenty of it. Roger Ball came in at first place with a 9:45 with a 10 point landing. I came in with a 9:40 and a 20 point landing. Tom Erickson came in third with a 9:15 and a 20 point landing. Rich picked up the lucky dog and a 20 point landing for 48 points.

 

The second launch had 5 Radians and one Easy Star heading to the west looking for lift. Fred had to drop out do to aircraft issues. Flight times were shorter, lift was harder to find. Roger came in first again with a 6:36 and a 10 point landing. I came in a 6:32 also with a 10 point landing. Tom came in at 6:09 with a 20 point landing. Jon Graber captured the lucky dog and a 10 point landing for 58 points.

 

Launch number three had 6 Radians as Dennis LaBerg joined the party late. The wind picked up to 4-5 mph and the lift was there out to the west. At the eight minute mark, 4 pilots were high to the west and slowly began to head toward the field. As the clock counted down to the 9:45 mark, pilots were beginning to make their move and things got crowded around the landing circle. Roger got down at 9:56; I got down at 9:52. George Sullivan and Dennis missed the time limit and landed after the 10 minute buzzer. In our scramble to get down, landing points went out the window as none of the high timers had any landing points. Jon Graber captured the lucky dog and a 10 point landing for 36 points.

 

The fourth launch found flight times typical for an overcast day with minimal lift to be found. I had the longest flight with a 4:40. Roger came in with a 4:27 and 20 landing points. Tom came in with a 4:20 to round out the top 3. Jon Graber captured the lucky dog again for 16 points.

 

Winners for the day: Roger Ball with a total of 220 points, I had 216 points and Tom came in third with 179 points. Jon Graber flying in the Easy Star class had 140 points with 3 lucky dog landings.

 

Jeff should be back next month to resume control of Electroglide, hope to see a bigger crowd of pilots next month. The September Electroglide will take place on the 16th.

Electroglide Report for July 2017

 

The second launch had us all heading to the west, as high as we could get in the 20 seconds before motor shut off. The lift was there, brought to us by the breeze across Sea World. Flight times now jumped, the shortest time was Roger Ball’s 6:16, earning a maxed out 60 Lucky Dog points. Jim Bonnardel, flying the Radian Pro and Tom Erickson flying a standard Radian, battled it out towards the ten-minute time limit. Tom came in at 9:19 for first place, Jim a close second at 9:14 with a 20-point bonus landing. Really good flying guys. Scott Vance came in third at 7:53 with a 10-point landing. Dennis LaBerg also scored a 20-landing.

 

Can We

Can We Have a Club Chiropractor?

 

Third launch showed the lift was still available. I had a flight time of 9:29 plus a 20-point landing. Scott came in second with 9:02 with a 20-point landing. Dennis came in third at 8:30 with a 10-point landing. Fun stuff!

 

Jim Approach

Jim on Approach

 

The fourth and final launch was into a stronger breeze that seemed to be effecting the lift patterns. Flight times reflected this with Jim earning the longest flight at 6:37, also with a 20-point landing. Scott came in second at 6:02, I earned third place at 5:37. Roger also picked up a 20-point landing on this round.

 

Sliding

Jim-It’s still sliding

 

Winners for the day: Jim Bonnardel, flying in the open class had a point total of 238. All the other aircraft flown were in the Radian class. I had the highest point total at 233. Scott Vance came in second at 224, Dennis LaBerg came in third at 202.

 

Jim Well

Jim-Well it’s Still Worth 10 Points

 

I would like to point out that in the first launch, I had the shortest flight at 3:36 which earned me the Lucky Dog award. That award which when added to a 20-point landing bonus gave me a competitive 64 points for the first round. One does not need to be able to fly their glider a long time. Points are awarded for flight time and the target landings. Because of the Lucky Dog award for the first aircraft back on the runway, the flight points are doubled. Park your airplane in the target circle and you can pick up an additional 10, 20 or 30 points.

 

Launch

Jim, Jeff, Roger & Tim Heading Up

 

Come join us next month, the third Saturday. It really is fun and it makes you a better pilot.

 

The August Electroglide will take place on the 19th. I will be on vacation but Scott Vance will be hosting the event.

 

Cheers,

Jeff

 

 

Roger

 Roger-A Light Touch of Down Elevator

 

 

Roger yes

 Roger-Yess!!

Electroglide Results for May 2017

By Jeff Struthers,

 

It was a tough Electroglide this month what with the Beach to Bay Marathon restricting access to our field until 10:00 and the strong winds from the North West.

 

Lindbergh Field was reporting winds of 8 to 10 mph during our competition, it sure felt stronger at our field.

First launch happened at about 10:40 and six aircraft took to the sky. Jon Graber, flying an Easy Star 2 got it high and held it there for the longest flight at 5:43. Scott Vance had the next longest flight time at 4:36 and scored an extra 20-points on his landing.

 

Second launch saw a bit stronger winds with only four aircraft flight ready. Roger Ball had the long flight at 4:50 with a 20-point landing. Scott Vance came in second at 3:50 and earning a 10-point landing. Those were the only extra landing credits earned.

 

Third launch found the wind was the only lift out there. Five aircraft were pointed North West at various altitudes, slowly descending while being blown in a South-East direction. The only way to stay north of our runway was to dive a bit and gain some airspeed. Scott Vance had the longest flight at 3:20. Also managing to stay near the target circles, scoring 20 points on landing. Roger Ball came in next at 3:12 with a 10-point landing.

 

Fourth and final launch saw the same windy conditions but we were getting the hang of it. Scott Vance again had the longest flight at 4:41 and a 20-point landing. Roger Ball came in at 3:52, I came in at 3:27. Stephen Treger scored the only other landing bonus with 10-points.

 

George Sullivan flew his DJI Mavic during the competition and recorded some video of us trying to land in the target circles. Notice the club’s wind sock.

 

Yes, the wind made it tough. It also made us learn to fly better. Don’t Spill the Beans, Bomb Drop, Pop Wing and Quad Copter racing, any competition that pushes us has the effect of making us better pilots.

 

The next Electroglide will be held on June 17th at 9:30.

 

Until then,

Jeff

 

Here is a You Tube link that contains video of a portion of the competition. Club member George Sullivan recorded the video from a DJI Quad-copter.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ou5ZZCf_owc

Electroglide Report for April 2017

 

Lucky

 Lucky Dog again

 

Second launch had short flight times as well. The longest time aloft again going to Steve and Tom at 2:50 and 2:32 respectively. Only Tom picked up a landing credit (20-points), for that round .

 

For the Third launch only Tom Erickson found the lift, staying aloft for 3:35 and scoring a 30-point landing credit. Rich Rogers had the second longest flight at 2:25 and picked up a 10-point landing credit. Fred Daugherty, flying for 2:08 picked up a 20-point landing. Stephen Treger flew for 2:11 and scored a 10-point landing.

 

Fred

 Fred, Stephen and Rich

 

Fourth and final launch found Tom Erickson above and alone from all the rest. With a flight time of 4:40 his closest competitor was Fred Daugherty at 3:20. Fred being the only pilot of that round earning a landing credit, 20-points.

 

Tom

30 points for Tom

 

Winner of the day is Tom Erickson with total points of 137. Second place goes to Fred Daugherty at 85 points. Third place is Stephen Treger at 79 points. Kudos for the day go to Tom for finding lift when others could not and Jim for keeping at it when the motor in his aircraft was so weak.

 

Extra

Going for extra points

 

Next Electroglide is scheduled for May 20th. Until then let’s fix our airplanes, practice and hope for lift.

Jeff

Electroglide Report for March 2017

 

 

EG 2

 Go!

 

 

The first launch looked great as 7 aircraft took to the sky. Flight times were short, with most coming back down within 4 minutes. Roger Ball got the long flight working some ridge lift above the boat ramp, coming down at 7:38 with a 10 landing. Skip Babbitt got the Lucky Dog award at 1:10 and picked up a 30-point landing credit. Fred Daugherty and Jim Bonnardel also scored 30 point landings. Steve Gobel and Scott Vance picked up 20 point landings.

 

EG 3

 Jim Launching

 

The second launch again had short flight times with only two pilots going over 4 minutes aloft. Roger Ball at 4:58 and Jim Bonnardel at 4:27. Roger Ball and Fred Daugherty both picked 10 point landing credits.

 

EG 4

Concentration

 

Third launch again had short flight times with only Roger Ball exceeding 4 minutes with a flight time of 5:50 and extra a credit landing of 10 points. Jim Bonnardel and Scott Vance both earned 20 point landings. Steve Gobel and Fred Daugherty also picked up 10 point landings.

 

EG 5

Lucky Dog Skipp

 

The fourth and final launch found all new conditions. We had lift and the flight times jumped. All flight times were above 5 minutes with Fred Daugherty first down and getting the Lucky Dog at 5:05. The longest flight went to Scott Vance at 8:45 with a 30 point landing. Jim Bonnardel, flying on one working aileron, came in second with 8:01 flight time and also picked up a 30-point landing. 10 point landings were earned by Skip, Roger and Tom Erickson.

 

EG 6

Roger on Long Flight

 

Winners for the day were Roger Ball at 197 points, Jim Bonnardel at 187 points and Skip Babbit with 177 points. Yes, I checked the math. 1st, 2nd and 3rd are separated by 10 points each. That’s got to be a first.

 

eg 7

T – 10 Seconds

 

It was a enjoyable start for the Electroglide and we all had a good time, again proving that the clubs contests are a fun and challenging way to enjoy our hobby. Next Electroglide is scheduled for April 15th.

 

See you there,

Jeff

 

eg 8

 Fred, Roger, Scott, Jim & Steve

 

 

 

Electroglide Results for September

 

The third launch proved even shorter flight times with the longest coming from Brian’s Multiplex Heron at 3 minutes, 18 seconds. Fred scored a 30-point landing, boosting his flight time score of 14 points to a respectable total score of 44 points.

 

The fourth and final launch yielded flight times in the 5 and 6 minute lengths. Perhaps the sun had finally heated Sea World’s parking lot enough for the thermals to develop. The lift was there to the northwest and we made good use of it. Fred had the longest flight of 6 minutes, 30 seconds, flying his Radian 29 seconds longer then Brian’s big open class Heron. Roger and I both scored 20 point landings, Tom picked a 10-point landing. This was a fun round and enjoyed by all.

 

Sore Necks

Our Necks Get Sore

 

First place for the day goes to Roger Ball at 163 points, second place goes to Tom Erickson at 135 points and third place goes to yours truly at 121 points.

 

Next and final Electroglide for 2016 is set for October 15th, usual start time of 9:30. We will not compete in November and December. The Electroglide for 2017 starts up on the third Saturday in January, the 21st.

 

All the Electroglide pilots for 2016, please come down for the October Electroglide. We will have a free raffle for you thanks to the Club’s Board of Directors. The raffle will start after the fourth and final landings.

 

I also want to point out this year’s point score totals, at least those higher totals that may be worth a first, second or third place finish. In adding up the current scores from the collected score sheets we have:

 

Bob Stinson – 967

Scott Vance – 897

Vince Gonsowski – 738

Roger Ball – 597

Fred Daugherty – 589

Rich Rogers – 503

Jon Graber – 412

Dennis LaBerge – 333

 

One more contest will decide 1st, 2nd and 3rd place prizes to be awarded. Our Board of Directors has been very gracious in awarding these prizes so come out for the last flights in October and try to place in the top spots. It’s worth it.

 

Until then,

 

Jeff Struthers

 

 

Electroglide Report for August 2016

 

Launch

 Off & Running

 

The first launch looked great, with all nine aircraft charging up into a now westerly breeze. After “motors off “, most pilots headed west looking for the lift coming from Sea World’s parking lot. The wind made it tricky to stay in the lift however, with only Bob Stinson and Roger Ball staying aloft beyond 5 minutes. Bob had the longest flight of 5 min. 13 seconds and topped that with a 30-point landing.

 

The second launch was similar in flight times and conditions, but the landings for extra credit became really fun. Take a look at the enclosed pictures, that’s three of us parked in the bullseye and a forth aircraft halfway in. That round had three 30 point landings, two 20 point landings and two 10 point landings. Roger Ball had the longest flight of 5:10 and one of the 10 point landings. Really good flying guys.

 

 

Concentration

Concentration

 

The third launch found the wind a bit stronger and the flight times were mostly in the mid 3 minutes. Only Scott Vance and Brian McCune had times above 4 minutes. Scott had a 4:30 aloft and Brian had his Multiplex Heron working well for a winning time of 6:37.

 

The fourth and final launch had short flight times as well, the lift being hard to find. Scott Vance and Brian McCune again had the longest flights. Scott had 4:04 aloft and Brian had 5:14. Most of us managed to land on the runway, but only Scott (20 pt.) and Rich (10 pt.) made the target circles.

 

 

Conc

More Concentration

 

Placing first for the day is Scott Vance at 216 points. Second place goes to Bob Stinson at 170 points and third place goes to Brian McCune with 150 points.

 

Bob Stinson and I noted that, as far as we can remember, no one has scored four 30 point landings in one Electroglide competition. Scott Vance had three last Saturday, his final landing coming close with 20 points.

 

For those of you who do not know the rules for an Electroglide, we only allow 20 seconds of motor run time. During those 20 seconds we have to get our aircraft high enough (max of 400 ft.), so it can glide to where we think the lift will be. If we find some lift that’s great, because each minute aloft is worth six points and every ten seconds is worth 1 point.

 

We set the maximum flight time per launch at 10 minutes. If we fly beyond that, no score is awarded. If we land off the runway, again, no score is awarded. Extra points come from landing in the target circles, (30, 20 and 10 points). The first aircraft that lands on the runway gets a “Lucky Dog “award, which means the time aloft is doubled.

 

Remember, all this flying is done “Dead Stick”, the motor is turned off after the first 20 seconds. Like the other contests the club organizes, this kind of flying teaches you to pay close attention to your aircraft and that translates to good flying skills for any pilot.

 

Want to try? This is challenging and fun. The next Electroglide is scheduled for September 17th at 9:30.

 

Until then,

 

Jeff Struthers

Electroglide Report for June 2016

It was a sunny morning for the Electroglide competition this month. No June gloom, just blue skies. We did, however, have some wind. At 9:00 a.m., Lindbergh Field was reporting 8 mph winds coming from the north. By the 9:30 launch time, the winds were shifting to the west and approaching 10 mph.

 On the first launch, we had eight pilots start, but Fred and Scott had to drop out due to problems with their aircraft.  All remaining aircraft being flown were Radians.  Vince and Tom were able to find the lift to the west of the field. Vince stayed up for 8:53 and scored a 20 pt. bonus landing. Tom had a duration of 7:10 aloft and picked up a 10 pt. landing.

 The second launch was into a north west breeze. It blew all the lift away that Vince and Tom had made such good use of in the first round.  On my way back to the landing zone with the timer approaching 4 minutes, I found some ridge lift just east of the boat launch area. It was a nice little bump that turned my short flight into a pleasure of 7:08 duration.  Hitting a 20 pt. landing bonus was the cherry on top.  I should also mention that all pilots in the second launch scored bonus landing points, all of us.  Has that been done before?

 The third launch was into tricky wind and flight times were on the short side. New member Bryan Respess got the longest flight of 5:22. The rest of us were well below that. Only myself and Roger were able to hit the bonus circles on landing.

 The fourth and final launch saw conditions not much better, with flight times under six minutes. Roger got the Lucky Dog award for a 47 second flight, but landed center circle for 30 bonus points. Nice save Roger.   Again though, only two pilots scored a landing bonus. Vince being the other with a 20 pt.

 Winners for June: Vince Gonsowski came in first with 175 points, I managed second place with 170 and Tom Erickson came third with 143 points.
Mark your calendars for the next Electroglide, July 16th.

See you there,
Jeff Struthers