Electroglide Report for August 2016

 

Launch

 Off & Running

 

The first launch looked great, with all nine aircraft charging up into a now westerly breeze. After “motors off “, most pilots headed west looking for the lift coming from Sea World’s parking lot. The wind made it tricky to stay in the lift however, with only Bob Stinson and Roger Ball staying aloft beyond 5 minutes. Bob had the longest flight of 5 min. 13 seconds and topped that with a 30-point landing.

 

The second launch was similar in flight times and conditions, but the landings for extra credit became really fun. Take a look at the enclosed pictures, that’s three of us parked in the bullseye and a forth aircraft halfway in. That round had three 30 point landings, two 20 point landings and two 10 point landings. Roger Ball had the longest flight of 5:10 and one of the 10 point landings. Really good flying guys.

 

 

Concentration

Concentration

 

The third launch found the wind a bit stronger and the flight times were mostly in the mid 3 minutes. Only Scott Vance and Brian McCune had times above 4 minutes. Scott had a 4:30 aloft and Brian had his Multiplex Heron working well for a winning time of 6:37.

 

The fourth and final launch had short flight times as well, the lift being hard to find. Scott Vance and Brian McCune again had the longest flights. Scott had 4:04 aloft and Brian had 5:14. Most of us managed to land on the runway, but only Scott (20 pt.) and Rich (10 pt.) made the target circles.

 

 

Conc

More Concentration

 

Placing first for the day is Scott Vance at 216 points. Second place goes to Bob Stinson at 170 points and third place goes to Brian McCune with 150 points.

 

Bob Stinson and I noted that, as far as we can remember, no one has scored four 30 point landings in one Electroglide competition. Scott Vance had three last Saturday, his final landing coming close with 20 points.

 

For those of you who do not know the rules for an Electroglide, we only allow 20 seconds of motor run time. During those 20 seconds we have to get our aircraft high enough (max of 400 ft.), so it can glide to where we think the lift will be. If we find some lift that’s great, because each minute aloft is worth six points and every ten seconds is worth 1 point.

 

We set the maximum flight time per launch at 10 minutes. If we fly beyond that, no score is awarded. If we land off the runway, again, no score is awarded. Extra points come from landing in the target circles, (30, 20 and 10 points). The first aircraft that lands on the runway gets a “Lucky Dog “award, which means the time aloft is doubled.

 

Remember, all this flying is done “Dead Stick”, the motor is turned off after the first 20 seconds. Like the other contests the club organizes, this kind of flying teaches you to pay close attention to your aircraft and that translates to good flying skills for any pilot.

 

Want to try? This is challenging and fun. The next Electroglide is scheduled for September 17th at 9:30.

 

Until then,

 

Jeff Struthers