Daily Archives: August 26, 2022

9 posts

Chairman’s Corner for Aug – Sep 2022

Hello members, as we get closer to the end of the year, yeah I know it sounds crazy talking about the end of the year, but here we are approaching the end of summer. Just a few reminders to mention that August, September, and October will be our last month meetings for the year as well as the fun-fly’s. Most of us have plans for Thanksgiving and Christmas so we will not be having our events. Come out this weekend for our event and enjoy the fun we have out at the
field.

I do want you to mark your calendars for January 13, 2023, for our SEFSD Annual Banquet will be held at the Air and Space Museum! So, make sure you get your tickets as soon as they come on sale. Prices for the event will be mentioned later in the Newsletter. We are going to have great prizes once again and prizes for our better halves, our wife’s!!!

Our parking lot is drying up and more dust is being produced when cars are traveling over the speed limit set at the field. Just a reminder to all members of the 5-mile hour speed limit. Let’s slow it down and keep the dust down! Thanks.

Remember the Red Bull air stunt that was done back in April of this year, well the NTSB came down with its final report on the Red Bull crash.

The National Transportation Safety Board has released its final report regarding the crash of a Cessna 182 that was part of the Red Bull Airplane Swap stunt.

The stunt, which was streamed on Hulu on April 24, 2022, involved pilots and skydivers Luke Aikins, 48, and Andy Farrington, 39, flying a pair of modified C-182s.

The plan was to fly the aircraft to an altitude of more than 12,000 feet above the Arizona desert. The pilots would then put the aircraft into synchronous steep dives, bail out of their respective airplanes wearing parachutes, and maneuver in freefall in order to enter each other’s airplane. Once aboard, they would recover the aircraft from their descents and land normally.

The aircraft were modified with a range of equipment including aerodynamic brakes to keep them from gaining excessive speed in the near-vertical dive, and grab bars to help Aikins and Farrington get back into the airplanes during the plunge. The 182s each included a custom autopilot designed to maintain an unusually steep descent path.

What Happened

Video of the event shows the aircraft entering the nose down attitude and the pilots departing the cockpits. As Aikins departed the accident aircraft, the nose pitched up and it entered an inverted spin. Aikins was able to enter the other aircraft and fly it to the landing spot. Farrington chose not to attempt to enter the spinning aircraft and instead descended to the ground via parachute.

According to the NTSB, the probable cause of the crash was a ballast shift aboard the unoccupied aircraft that resulted in it exceeding the critical angle of attack. The aircraft entered a stall and subsequent spin from which it did not recover. Investigators noted the accident aircraft was equipped with a ballistic parachute that was designed to trigger at an altitude of 1,000 feet. The parachute did activate while the airplane was inverted, but it did not fully deploy. The aircraft hit the ground and was substantially damaged. It was noted in the final report that the NTSB did not travel to the site of the accident.

Because of the nature of the stunt, practice in advance of the streaming on Hulu was not an option, as Farrington stated on the Red Bull website: “There is no way to test it until you do it.”

FAA Revokes Pilot Certificates

The FAA noted that Aikins and Farrignton did not have permission to perform the stunt. In a statement issued to FLYING shortly after the stunt failed, the agency noted it “denied the organizer’s request for an exemption from federal regulations that cover the safe operation of an aircraft.” Aikin later admitted in an Instagram post that he had received the FAA denial but he did not inform Red Bull or his team members.

Following the failed stunt in May, the FAA issued an emergency revocation of both Aikin’s and Farrington’s pilot certificates. Neither one will be able to apply for or be issued a new airman certificate for one year. The FAA also proposed a $4,932 fine for Aikins for violating three regulations: FAR 91.105(a) flight crew members remaining at their stations, 91.113(b) the duty of the pilot to see and avoid other aircraft and 91.13 the operation of an aircraft in a careless and reckless manner.

DC-3 Update:

I do have good news that I was able to start working on my DC-3. I started the center section of the wing, which is not all glued in place, here I am just fitting the parts to make sure all fits perfect. Not only that, I had to create the mods on the parts to accommodate the retracts. I will have more of a write up come next month when I hope to have the main construction completed of the wing. So, for now I have this one picture of the center section of the wing.

Ok members I look forward to seeing you all, this weekend for the Monthly Meeting and Fun Fly!

Jovi,
Chairman of the Board!

President’s Corner for Aug – Sep 2022

By Steve Manganelli

Probably not the best leading story, but I’m compelled to announce that we will be having a dues increase for 2023. Inflation is generally rearing its ugly head (been to the grocery story lately?) and as austere as our expenses generally are, they are going up. The cost of the port-a-potty is increasing, the cost of renting the roller for the field has gone up substantially and the collaterally required water truck is just plain not available! Yes, the BOD recognizes the field has dried up to the point that an application of the dust down is needed but until we can secure a water truck, this can’t happen. Inflationary pressures are going to affect all R/C model clubs in town; we do expect to continue to be your best value club next year as well.

Inflation is also effecting our annual Holiday banquet. We are attempting to close that gap via divesting the Club Trailer, but even with that additional expected funding source, the ticket price is going to be higher. You wanted the Aerospace Museum again, we listened and now we have to pay for it. Oh yeah, the Museum raised their prices too! Let’s face it: a couple is not going to go into any decent restaurant, have hors d’oeuvres a couple of drinks, dessert and walk out of there for anything close to $110. Think of that comparatively when the banquet is formally announced and tickets are available. That $110 won’t give you a chance to win any airplanes either! If someone wants to visit a restaurant where a couple won’t get out of for under $300, let me know, I have a few suggestions for you!

Does your model have a story? I was recently treated to a fascinating tale of a warbird where the member started with an off-the-shelf foam ARF, then customized it to represent a particular aircraft in history. I believe there was some supplemental painting, custom graphics and specific serial numbers applied to make his model like no other out-of-the-box ARF. The full scale aircraft had a really neat story of it’s exploits in WWII. I never really thought about customizing an ARF to yield something historically significant, but it does sound like a really nice enrichment of our hobby where ARFs now prevail and something that needs to be written up in PEAKCHARGE! So if this sounds like something you did or would like to do, please share it with us! The article should state what R/C model you started with, where and how you obtained the enhancement graphics, paint, and any other customizing hardware and then a description of its full scale exploits including its pilot if known. I’d say we’d need at least one picture of the model with you in it as well!

I love my new SEFSD LOGO sunshield hat from LNN Custom Apparel! The beauty of this custom process is the large variety of items you can obtain with our logo on it. Clearly as a small business owner and given the size of “our market” we obviously can’t expect to have everything shown on the website in stock and in every color and size possible for immediate delivery. Rather, LNN must have a relationship with her suppliers to obtain the basic garment on demand and then she customizes it for us to our custom order!  This is so cool! I admired Alex Sutton’s hoodie sweatshirt with graphics the other day. I’m probably going to need one of those for when the weather cools. I also heard that you can have your name embroidered as well for a small additional fee; how doubly cool is that?

Finally, the last fun-contest/hot dog cookout was a fun as ever. Master of ceremonies, Jim Bonnardel, began with an “explanation” of Altitude Quest. You spin the dial, needle lands on a graphic showing 50 to 175 in 25 increments, fly to that altitude (without going over) Jim reads out your peak height from a small recording altimeter, closest to proscribed altitude wins! Easy, right? What if there’s a tie, Jim? Signup order prevails! Earliest sign up breaks the tie! Oh crud, everybody get out of my way while I sign up! What if you go over, Jim? “Under beats over in a tie!” OK, so 1 foot under beats 1 foot over, correct? “Yeah”. So does 1 foot over beat 2 feet under? “Uhhh…Yep”. So what if 2 people are one foot over and 2 are one foot under, does sign up order prevail? “Yep”. Hmm…now we need a super computer to sort out the scores! I was a mere foot over and anticipated being in the money. As the prizes were being handed out and my name wasn’t called, I chalked that up to not understanding the scoring formula. I recall hooting and hollering to not one, but (2) pilots whom hit it to the exact altitude, a pretty good feat. I figured there must have been 3 other pilots whom were just a foot under. In general, you’re higher than you think; most pilots shooting for 150+ erred on the high side. Found out later that I should have been in the money but there was an error in scoring, did I want a supplemental prize? No need, already won: smiles, chuckles and camaraderie with a great group of friends. Thanks to Jovi for the hot dog cooking. We’ll see you at this month’s Fun Event.

Vice-President’s Corner for Aug/Sep 2022

Vice President’s Message:

You can now order SEFSD shirts with your name (or whatever you want) embroidered on them for only $10 extra! Mine came in this week and it looks great. Check out sefsd.org for the link to the online store to purchase your club swag and show your club spirit. The shop also carries a plethora of other accessories like hats, sweaters, and jackets.  Click a pic below:

Quan

Spot Landing Challenge

August Club Event: 

SPOT LANDING CHALLENGE! 

Saturday, 8.27.22

 

You get three landings (touch & go) to get a score.   Scoring is where the first wheel makes contact. 

SCORING TIES ARE DETERMINED BY THE CLOCK!  Don’t waste your time! 

Club meeting and BBQ to follow.

Otto Steals the Show with his RC Loon!

Flyguy Promotions received a contract from Wide Angle Group in early June to produce a 10 foot flying Loon based on the Minnesota United Loon logo. The Loon was flown as part of the Major League Soccer (MLS) pregame covered by ESPN. Mike Frandsen, Bob Simon, Dave Encinas and Otto Dieffenbach built the Loon in 5 weeks with first flight on July 10. Emily DeJoode, Manager of Ampdraw Hobbies in Encinitas joined Otto as his far corner spotter for the performance. Three rehearsals and the performance flights were flown on August 8, 9 and 10. FAA and FBI approvals were obtained prior to flight operations.

The performance and project were considered great successes by ESPN, MLS and Minnesota United. 

Alex’s Solo Video

This video is part of Aviator Alex’s continuing adventures flying Radio Control aircraft with Silent Electric Flyers San Diego, and in the air flying Sailplanes with Cypress Soaring! Aviator Alex is working towards eventually becoming a Jet Airliner Pilot, and we have no doubt he’ll achieve his worthy and challenging goal!

T28 Racing Report for Aug 2022

The August edition of our T20 racing was a fun event with a good turnout of 12 pilots . We had most of the usual locals in attendance along with a couple visitors one from the Weedwackers (Glen) and one from Switzerland( Urs) flying a borrowed plane. 
With Jovi handling calling up pilots and scoring things ran smoothly. With the 3 plane heats there was a lot of close wing tip to wing tip racing in the preliminary rounds. After the scores were totaled for the preliminary rounds the results were as follows for the finals:
Bronze Cup:
1st Carl L 
2nd Bob S
3rd Alfred
4th Larry
Silver Cup:
1st Brad
2nd Quan
3rd Glen
4th Steve M
Gold Cup:
1st Steve N
2nd Alex *
3rd Otto*
4th Urs*
The Silver and Bronze Cups went off without much drama but the gold cup was not so lucky. It started off with Urs watching the wrong plane when taking off resulting in 4 pilots watching 3 planes climb  out from take-off as they should but with a lone  plane having a low level adventure into the parking area( minor damage). Down to 3 planes…next I believe Otto flew so low a bush reached up and grabbed his plane —now  2 planes left—next Alex had something happen—I don’t recall what happened but it did not help his flight. The net result was at the end of 10 laps I was alone in first place. It sure would have been more fun if everyone had gone the full ten laps—there is always next time!  One takeaway from this story is that it makes sense to decorate your plane so as to avoid situations where you end up trying to fly the wrong model. Also note that if you don’t have racing numbers on your plane please get them installed. If you need a number email me with your  3 choices between one and 99( most of the numbers < 20 are already taken)
Next race day is Sept 10th at 10am. As usual visitors from other clubs are welcome to fly in our T28 races. 
Go fast and tun left!
Steve Neu

Electroglide Report for Aug 2022

By Scott Vance

The August Electroglide had 6 pilots brave the overcast skies and a stiff south wind all day.

Round 1 had all pilots launching from the north weed line in a south west direction to avoid flying over the pits.  It was a challenge for all to find wind lift.  In the Radian Class, Stephen had the longest flight with 4:41 and a 20 point landing.  Dennis had a 2:20 flight with a 30 point landing.  Alex got the Luckydog.

Round 2 again had Stephen with the longest flight at 2:23 with a 20 point landing.  Bob had 1:54 with a 20 point landing.  Alex got the Luckydog with a 20 point landing.  In the Open Class, Daric had a flight time of 1:52 with a 10 point landing.  Neil had a 1:40 flight with a 20 point landing.

Round 3 saw the wind increase as did flight times.  Bob had the longest flight time in the Radian Class, 2:41.  Alex had a flight time of 1:59 with a 30 point landing.  In the Open Class, Daric had a time of 3:26 with a 20 point landing.  Neil got the Luckydog and a 10 point landing.

Round 4 had Dennis with a time of 3:49 and a 10 point landing that he really had to work for.  Bob had a time of 2:29 with a perfect 30 point landing.  Alex had a time of 2:19 with a 10 point landing.  In the Open Class, Neil got the Luckydog and a 30 point landing.  Daric had the longest flight time of the day at 7:25.

The big winners for the day are Stephen in the Radian Class with 133 points and Neil in the Open Class with 138 points.  Congrats to all of today’s pilots for flying safely in very challenging conditions.