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Chairman’s Corner for Sep/Oct 2022

Hello Club members, three more months and we have Christmas….maybe now is the time to start shopping….We are also coming up on our last two monthly meetings and events.  Oh that includes the Hot Dogs….So come on out this Saturday and enjoy a good time with our members and have a Hot Dog or two.

A few weeks ago, we noticed we had RC Trucks and cars running round our runway.  May I need to remind everyone that this is a runway and not made for RC Trucks or cars.  Somehow this happened, maybe due to the gate be left open and we all know to lock the gate as you are the last one out of the field.  And if someone else is parked and does not appear to be flying airplanes, I would recommend you drive over to them and inform that you are locking the gate.  Let us not presume that this person is a member of the club.   Now I know we have a few members who have RC cars and all I ask that you do not do what these people have done and think that its ok, well it is not!   Just remember to LOCK the gate as you are the last person to leave.   Thank You!

Folks, it is that time of year for new officers to step forward and be a club leader.   This is your club so come on up and run for President, Vice-President, Secretary, Treasure.   For I will be ending my term as Chairman of the Board and will be leaving that role to Steve Manganelli.  However, it is possible that Steve will run for Treasure and if that is the case, then I am happy to remain Chairman of the Board.

I must apologize for my short article.  It happens to be that I am in Foley Alabama working on 787 Cowl Inlets.  This facility is the assembly factory, and it is very cool in how the engine cowls are built.

I look forward to seeing you all at the field on Saturday…..

Chairman of the Board

President’s Corner for Sep/Oct 2022

Shall we put the bad news at the top to get it over with? Sixty dollars; that’s what it’s going to cost to remain a member of SEFSD in 2023. With increases in Paypal fees, the port-a-potty, field rolling equipment and the Winter banquet, an extra $10 is what we need to break even over the current dues of $50. Thanks to Quan for putting together a budget forecast for us. I also received my AMA dues bill the other day which also went up $10 so the price to fly went up a total of $20. Compared with what most of us spend on models and batteries every year, an extra $20 is trivial. Included in that price increase was the Dust Down that would have been applied by now if not for lack of availability of a water truck! The “Hurricane rain” we had the other week helped a lot; just too bad we couldn’t get mother nature to add the dust down material to our rain.

Next up, I am sad to report the resignation of our Treasurer, Alan Issacs. Apparently too many lost models and inability to control them led to Alan’s conclusion that he might not be suited for this hobby. Thank you for your service to date Alan, you were an excellent Treasurer and are welcome to serve out the year in that capacity if you wish to. Our Vice President and previous Treasurer Quan Nguyen has stepped in to fill that void until next year, whereas I’m taking over as Treasurer! This leads into the next subject: succession!

Any thoughts or differences of opinion as to how the Club should be run? Do we want more events or less? Do we like the hot dogs that go with our Monthly Fun Contest and meeting? Do we like the Banquet at the Aerospace Museum (for $55 per person) or would we like it somewhere else at a lower cost? To have a say in these decisions, volunteer or run for a BOD position! Aside from Alan, we have (2) other BOD members whom will not be going forward into next year. I am pleased to announce that our previous President, Brad Bender will be returning to lead us: Thanks for that Brad, you are a great leader, definitely better than myself! This still leaves (2) open positions. Those continuing on the BOD are willing to shuffle around a bit to accommodate newbies. The “Member at Large” is a good place to get one’s feet wet. All you have to do is attend the BOD meetings on the nominally 2nd Wednesday of the month participate in discussion and vote on the outcomes. The secretary position requires attending BOD meetings and taking minutes, not too hard either. Please think about it. Any questions about roles and responsibilities, please shoot me an E-mail. I also wish to recognize our expert Badge Maker, Mr. Peter Kalenak whom took over for George Sullivan this past Spring. Peter is doing an outstandingly competent, no complaints job of it, which is all we can ask for; thanks for your service, Peter.

Have you taken your “TRUST” test yet? This is what I thought to be a silly FAA requirement to allow us to continue flying “recreational drones”. The FAA considers “Quad Copters” and fixed wing R/C models the same. I presumed with my 45 years of R/C modeling experience, the test should be a breeze, but in fact that experience had nothing to do with it! The test is all about how to follow the new FAA rules for recreational drones.  The bottom line is as long as you’re flying at our field, you don’t have to do anything different than you do now. The test does reinforce the requirement to maintain Visual Line Of Sight (VLOS) to control your R/C model (or drone), have a spotter for FPV google flying and a few other things that have been determined specifically for our site vs generically. Our altitude limit set by local FAA Air Traffic Controllers is 200 ft for our Class B airspace (in case you didn’t know our proximity to San Diego International Airport puts us in Class B airspace). For those that dabble in quad copters at places other than our field, there are more things you need to know and comply with. Since I also renewed my FAA credentials at the same time, I was required to identify at least one R/C model in order to do so. Let’s see: no transponder, manufacturer is myself and I named it “Generic R/C Model”.  Don’t forget to have your FAA Identification number on the outside of all your models.  At this time, the club is not planning on enforcing compliance with FAA identification requirements, but if someone from the FAA chose to do so, an established R/C field would be a logical choice vs trying to hunt down one drone flying in some park or field. Take the TRUST Test here : The Recreational UAS Safety Test (TRUST) | THE RECREATIONAL UAS SAFETY TEST (TRUST) TEST by AMA (modelaircraft.org) if you haven’t already.

We were finally able to attend our first Mission Bay Park Planning Meeting. Larry Kosta, Myself  and professional Planner Denise Larson attended the September, 2022 meeting of the Mission Bay Park committee at the Santa Clara Pt. REC center.  The first part of the meeting was briefed by SDPD representatives and centered on illegal parking, homeless/vagrants and enforcement of Beach Ordinances. They had plenty of funding, just not enough manpower, the overflow requirements staffed by over-time. Next, individuals representing various organizations pitched their plans for running races that involved road/parking lot closures and paths in and around the park.  They then ended that meeting and opened a “Park Improvements” meeting where the sole agenda item was a $56,000 repaving of a parking lot at “Sunset Point”. This was pitched by a City Staffer and approved with 1 NO vote. Our goal for the meeting was to understand the planning process and ascertain how we can be included in the Mission Bay Park “Master Plan” which by the way, doesn’t include us. At present we are considering presentation of a “Story Board” style introductory/history pitch of our activities highlighting our community service and charitable activities. At least the committee would have a face to our name and be aware of our history.

Do you have your club swag with custom SEFSD LOGO from LNN Custom Apparel? (via our Weblink: http://companycasuals.com/SEFSD)! We discussed the possibility of having a larger version of our logo silk screened on the back of a Tee Shirt. This is possible, but involves bulk fabrication with setup charges and the club would have to pick sizes and colors and then be at risk for any unsold merchandise. We’re still looking into it. At the last fun-fly contest I say Quan Nguyen’s logo embroidered polo shirt with his name on it: way cool!

I want to clarify something in Jovi’s Chairman’s corner. Though operating R/C cars on the runway is not allowed, if a club member wishes to occasionally operate an R/C dune buggy on the East end of the parking lot late in the day on a non-interference basis (at the present time at least) is okay. These things do kick up some dust so operators need to be conscious of their surroundings.  Non-club members should definitely not be operating R/C cars on the site and if it becomes an attractive nuisance the policy may have to change.  I’m told there is a site somewhere on Fiesta Island for R/C buggys.

Finally, the last fun-contest/hot dog cookout was a fun as ever. Master of ceremonies Jim Bonnardel began with an explanation of the simplest event yet as he described it : “Spot Landing Challenge” . You get (3) touch and go passes on the circles, the inner most one being 30 points, the middle one 20 and the outer one 10. Miss the circles but touch on the runway gets 5 points. In case of ties, fastest time wins. Anyone whom can add up 3 numbers (in multiples of 5) in their heads should be able to score this, right? Jim cleverly tagged Jovi with the 3 number adding exercise and Jovi in turn passed on the task of picking the winners and breaking the ties to me while he fired up the BBQ. Uhhh…well? How many very competent journeyman engineers does it take to screw in a lightbulb and/or add up (3) numbers in their heads and adjudicate ties from the lowest time? More than (2) apparently as like last month we failed to get it right, arrghh!  I suggested the way forward is to award the prizes and then immediately use the scoresheet to light the BBQ, thus erasing any evidence of mistakes! Thanks to Jovi again for the hot dog cooking; Mark Davis is scheduled to reprise his role as master hot dog cooker this month and next month.  Welcome back Mark!   We’ll see you at this month’s Fun Event.

Steve Manganelli

Civilian Scale Day

September’s Club Event:

Civilian Scale Day

This is your chance to show off your scale airplanes! 
Private and commercial! 
We will highlight and feature scale aircraft across the
hobby spectrum.  If the airplane exists in the real world, and is not military, then this is your event to shine!  Each participation component (flight & display) earns raffle ticket(s), and all of the tickets are in play. If you earn 3 raffle tickets, you could win 3 prizes!  
We will have Scale open flying,  a pilots vote session, and the 
“Oshkosh Hour” 
where any aircraft that would fly in and attend at Oshkosh, 
can earn bonus tickets by flying for judges.
Scale flights begin at 10:am with club meeting and BBQ to follow.

Electroglide Report for Sep 2022

 The summer sun did not bless the Electroglide this past Saturday. We had overcast skies and a moderately strong south wind at launch time. This forced us to launch from the northern edge of our runway, and then try to find some clean air for wind lift. Flight times became short, so landing in the target circles would now carry much more importance. 

 First launch had seven aircraft, four Radians and three open class aircraft, in a steep climb into the wind. After ten seconds, all motors were shut off and it was a challenge to find clean air. Bob Anson, flying a Conscendo, had the long flight at 1:45 minutes with a 10-point landing. Stephen Trager, with a Radian, was second with a flight of 1:36 plus a 20-point landing. Daric knight, flying a Multiplex Heron, was third with a time of 1:28. Alex Sutton, flying a Radian, picked up a 30-point landing.

 Second launch had a little improvement in the flight times. Stephen again had the long flight at 3:24 and a 20-point landing. Bob Anson was second with a flight of 3:08. Jeff Struthers, flying a Radian, came in third at 2:59 with a 20-point landing. Alex again had a 30-point landing, Neil Zhu and Fritz Logan both had 20-point landings and Deric had a 10-point landing.  

 Third launch had Jeff with the long flight of 3:56. In second place was Stephen at 3:32 and a 30-point landing. Third place was earned by Neil, flying a Conscendo, at 2:20 with a 20-point landing.

 Fourth and final launch had the flight time’s drop back a bit. Jeff had the long flight at 2:20 minutes with a 20-point landing. Stephen was second at 1:42, also getting a 20-point landing. Deric was third at 1:31 with a 10-point landing. Neil, also picked up a 10-point landing.

Winners for the day?

Radian Class,

1st. Place, Stephen Trager with 154 points.

2nd. Place, Alex Sutton with 108 points.

3rd. Place, Jeff Struthers with 96 points

Open Class,

1st. Place, Neil Zhu with 93 points

2nd Place, Deric Knight with 41 points

3rd. Place, Bob Anson with 40 points

 

 Yes, the flight times were quite short but we can’t control the weather. We can however, make up for poor flying conditions with our landings and many pilots were able to land within the target circles, despite the strong south wind. Good flying guys!

 Thanks to Frank Sutton for providing the event pictures.

Next and final Electroglide for the year will be on October 15th, usual start time of 10:00.

See you there,

Jeff Struthers

See the entire album of pics here.

T28 Race Report for Sep 2022

This will be quick as there was no race due to the weather that came through. Racing will return next month on the 8th at 10am. For those who want to learn more about the rules and general information please visit https://www.sefsd.org/club-contests/t28-racing/t28-rules-information/.  You fill find the rules and tips and tricks for setting up your T-28. Please come on out to fly or watch—there is usually something exciting to see! 
 
Steve Neu

Expansion Wave Induced Vapor Cone – Explained

990707-N-6483G-001
ABOARD USS CONSTELLATION (July 7, 1999)– Lieutenant Ron Candiloro, assigned to Fighter Squadron One Five One (VF-151), breaks the sound barrier in an F/A-18 “Hornet”. VF-151 is currently deployed with the USS Constellation (CV 64) battlegroup. U.S. Navy photo by Ensign John Gay. (RELEASED)

 

An F/A-18 Hornet over the Pacific Ocean, in July 1999. (Photo: Ensign John Gay/US Navy)

Ensign John Gay of the U.S. Navy had just returned home from several months aboard the U.S.S. Constellation in the South Pacific when his phone rang. A reporter for a photography magazine was on the line, hoping to discuss the 2000 World Press Photo Awards. Gay was perplexed: “Who are you and what do you want?” he said. The reporter explained that Gay’s photo had taken first prize in the Science and Technology category, which was news to Gay: he didn’t even know he’d entered the prestigious contest.

A lot had happened when Gay was at sea. But the photo held more surprises than just its global accolades. It captured a moment that was wildly misunderstood by most of the people who saw it—including the photographer.

Continue reading

Remember Captain Fred? I do!

Captain Fred was a local videographer who made half hour videos of San Diego Aviation subjects.  His TV show was called Captain Fred’s Aviation Theater.  I believe the shows were aired on cable’s public access in the 90s and early 2000’s, on Sunday evenings.  He and his wife Anna were the entire video crew.

We can enjoy his work these days on his Youtube channel.  Well worth taking the time to watch.

Some of us in the club met Fred Province when he came to make a video of our F5B event when we hosted it in 2000 on Fiesta Island.  Unfortunately, I cannot find that video on his channel.

Here are a couple links with information about Fred Province’s life:

Captain Fred 1

Captain Fred 2

Chairman’s Corner for Aug – Sep 2022

Hello members, as we get closer to the end of the year, yeah I know it sounds crazy talking about the end of the year, but here we are approaching the end of summer. Just a few reminders to mention that August, September, and October will be our last month meetings for the year as well as the fun-fly’s. Most of us have plans for Thanksgiving and Christmas so we will not be having our events. Come out this weekend for our event and enjoy the fun we have out at the
field.

I do want you to mark your calendars for January 13, 2023, for our SEFSD Annual Banquet will be held at the Air and Space Museum! So, make sure you get your tickets as soon as they come on sale. Prices for the event will be mentioned later in the Newsletter. We are going to have great prizes once again and prizes for our better halves, our wife’s!!!

Our parking lot is drying up and more dust is being produced when cars are traveling over the speed limit set at the field. Just a reminder to all members of the 5-mile hour speed limit. Let’s slow it down and keep the dust down! Thanks.

Remember the Red Bull air stunt that was done back in April of this year, well the NTSB came down with its final report on the Red Bull crash.

The National Transportation Safety Board has released its final report regarding the crash of a Cessna 182 that was part of the Red Bull Airplane Swap stunt.

The stunt, which was streamed on Hulu on April 24, 2022, involved pilots and skydivers Luke Aikins, 48, and Andy Farrington, 39, flying a pair of modified C-182s.

The plan was to fly the aircraft to an altitude of more than 12,000 feet above the Arizona desert. The pilots would then put the aircraft into synchronous steep dives, bail out of their respective airplanes wearing parachutes, and maneuver in freefall in order to enter each other’s airplane. Once aboard, they would recover the aircraft from their descents and land normally.

The aircraft were modified with a range of equipment including aerodynamic brakes to keep them from gaining excessive speed in the near-vertical dive, and grab bars to help Aikins and Farrington get back into the airplanes during the plunge. The 182s each included a custom autopilot designed to maintain an unusually steep descent path.

What Happened

Video of the event shows the aircraft entering the nose down attitude and the pilots departing the cockpits. As Aikins departed the accident aircraft, the nose pitched up and it entered an inverted spin. Aikins was able to enter the other aircraft and fly it to the landing spot. Farrington chose not to attempt to enter the spinning aircraft and instead descended to the ground via parachute.

According to the NTSB, the probable cause of the crash was a ballast shift aboard the unoccupied aircraft that resulted in it exceeding the critical angle of attack. The aircraft entered a stall and subsequent spin from which it did not recover. Investigators noted the accident aircraft was equipped with a ballistic parachute that was designed to trigger at an altitude of 1,000 feet. The parachute did activate while the airplane was inverted, but it did not fully deploy. The aircraft hit the ground and was substantially damaged. It was noted in the final report that the NTSB did not travel to the site of the accident.

Because of the nature of the stunt, practice in advance of the streaming on Hulu was not an option, as Farrington stated on the Red Bull website: “There is no way to test it until you do it.”

FAA Revokes Pilot Certificates

The FAA noted that Aikins and Farrignton did not have permission to perform the stunt. In a statement issued to FLYING shortly after the stunt failed, the agency noted it “denied the organizer’s request for an exemption from federal regulations that cover the safe operation of an aircraft.” Aikin later admitted in an Instagram post that he had received the FAA denial but he did not inform Red Bull or his team members.

Following the failed stunt in May, the FAA issued an emergency revocation of both Aikin’s and Farrington’s pilot certificates. Neither one will be able to apply for or be issued a new airman certificate for one year. The FAA also proposed a $4,932 fine for Aikins for violating three regulations: FAR 91.105(a) flight crew members remaining at their stations, 91.113(b) the duty of the pilot to see and avoid other aircraft and 91.13 the operation of an aircraft in a careless and reckless manner.

DC-3 Update:

I do have good news that I was able to start working on my DC-3. I started the center section of the wing, which is not all glued in place, here I am just fitting the parts to make sure all fits perfect. Not only that, I had to create the mods on the parts to accommodate the retracts. I will have more of a write up come next month when I hope to have the main construction completed of the wing. So, for now I have this one picture of the center section of the wing.

Ok members I look forward to seeing you all, this weekend for the Monthly Meeting and Fun Fly!

Jovi,
Chairman of the Board!

President’s Corner for Aug – Sep 2022

By Steve Manganelli

Probably not the best leading story, but I’m compelled to announce that we will be having a dues increase for 2023. Inflation is generally rearing its ugly head (been to the grocery story lately?) and as austere as our expenses generally are, they are going up. The cost of the port-a-potty is increasing, the cost of renting the roller for the field has gone up substantially and the collaterally required water truck is just plain not available! Yes, the BOD recognizes the field has dried up to the point that an application of the dust down is needed but until we can secure a water truck, this can’t happen. Inflationary pressures are going to affect all R/C model clubs in town; we do expect to continue to be your best value club next year as well.

Inflation is also effecting our annual Holiday banquet. We are attempting to close that gap via divesting the Club Trailer, but even with that additional expected funding source, the ticket price is going to be higher. You wanted the Aerospace Museum again, we listened and now we have to pay for it. Oh yeah, the Museum raised their prices too! Let’s face it: a couple is not going to go into any decent restaurant, have hors d’oeuvres a couple of drinks, dessert and walk out of there for anything close to $110. Think of that comparatively when the banquet is formally announced and tickets are available. That $110 won’t give you a chance to win any airplanes either! If someone wants to visit a restaurant where a couple won’t get out of for under $300, let me know, I have a few suggestions for you!

Does your model have a story? I was recently treated to a fascinating tale of a warbird where the member started with an off-the-shelf foam ARF, then customized it to represent a particular aircraft in history. I believe there was some supplemental painting, custom graphics and specific serial numbers applied to make his model like no other out-of-the-box ARF. The full scale aircraft had a really neat story of it’s exploits in WWII. I never really thought about customizing an ARF to yield something historically significant, but it does sound like a really nice enrichment of our hobby where ARFs now prevail and something that needs to be written up in PEAKCHARGE! So if this sounds like something you did or would like to do, please share it with us! The article should state what R/C model you started with, where and how you obtained the enhancement graphics, paint, and any other customizing hardware and then a description of its full scale exploits including its pilot if known. I’d say we’d need at least one picture of the model with you in it as well!

I love my new SEFSD LOGO sunshield hat from LNN Custom Apparel! The beauty of this custom process is the large variety of items you can obtain with our logo on it. Clearly as a small business owner and given the size of “our market” we obviously can’t expect to have everything shown on the website in stock and in every color and size possible for immediate delivery. Rather, LNN must have a relationship with her suppliers to obtain the basic garment on demand and then she customizes it for us to our custom order!  This is so cool! I admired Alex Sutton’s hoodie sweatshirt with graphics the other day. I’m probably going to need one of those for when the weather cools. I also heard that you can have your name embroidered as well for a small additional fee; how doubly cool is that?

Finally, the last fun-contest/hot dog cookout was a fun as ever. Master of ceremonies, Jim Bonnardel, began with an “explanation” of Altitude Quest. You spin the dial, needle lands on a graphic showing 50 to 175 in 25 increments, fly to that altitude (without going over) Jim reads out your peak height from a small recording altimeter, closest to proscribed altitude wins! Easy, right? What if there’s a tie, Jim? Signup order prevails! Earliest sign up breaks the tie! Oh crud, everybody get out of my way while I sign up! What if you go over, Jim? “Under beats over in a tie!” OK, so 1 foot under beats 1 foot over, correct? “Yeah”. So does 1 foot over beat 2 feet under? “Uhhh…Yep”. So what if 2 people are one foot over and 2 are one foot under, does sign up order prevail? “Yep”. Hmm…now we need a super computer to sort out the scores! I was a mere foot over and anticipated being in the money. As the prizes were being handed out and my name wasn’t called, I chalked that up to not understanding the scoring formula. I recall hooting and hollering to not one, but (2) pilots whom hit it to the exact altitude, a pretty good feat. I figured there must have been 3 other pilots whom were just a foot under. In general, you’re higher than you think; most pilots shooting for 150+ erred on the high side. Found out later that I should have been in the money but there was an error in scoring, did I want a supplemental prize? No need, already won: smiles, chuckles and camaraderie with a great group of friends. Thanks to Jovi for the hot dog cooking. We’ll see you at this month’s Fun Event.

Vice-President’s Corner for Aug/Sep 2022

Vice President’s Message:

You can now order SEFSD shirts with your name (or whatever you want) embroidered on them for only $10 extra! Mine came in this week and it looks great. Check out sefsd.org for the link to the online store to purchase your club swag and show your club spirit. The shop also carries a plethora of other accessories like hats, sweaters, and jackets.  Click a pic below:

Quan

Spot Landing Challenge

August Club Event: 

SPOT LANDING CHALLENGE! 

Saturday, 8.27.22

 

You get three landings (touch & go) to get a score.   Scoring is where the first wheel makes contact. 

SCORING TIES ARE DETERMINED BY THE CLOCK!  Don’t waste your time! 

Club meeting and BBQ to follow.

Otto Steals the Show with his RC Loon!

Flyguy Promotions received a contract from Wide Angle Group in early June to produce a 10 foot flying Loon based on the Minnesota United Loon logo. The Loon was flown as part of the Major League Soccer (MLS) pregame covered by ESPN. Mike Frandsen, Bob Simon, Dave Encinas and Otto Dieffenbach built the Loon in 5 weeks with first flight on July 10. Emily DeJoode, Manager of Ampdraw Hobbies in Encinitas joined Otto as his far corner spotter for the performance. Three rehearsals and the performance flights were flown on August 8, 9 and 10. FAA and FBI approvals were obtained prior to flight operations.

The performance and project were considered great successes by ESPN, MLS and Minnesota United. 

Alex’s Solo Video

This video is part of Aviator Alex’s continuing adventures flying Radio Control aircraft with Silent Electric Flyers San Diego, and in the air flying Sailplanes with Cypress Soaring! Aviator Alex is working towards eventually becoming a Jet Airliner Pilot, and we have no doubt he’ll achieve his worthy and challenging goal!

T28 Racing Report for Aug 2022

The August edition of our T20 racing was a fun event with a good turnout of 12 pilots . We had most of the usual locals in attendance along with a couple visitors one from the Weedwackers (Glen) and one from Switzerland( Urs) flying a borrowed plane. 
With Jovi handling calling up pilots and scoring things ran smoothly. With the 3 plane heats there was a lot of close wing tip to wing tip racing in the preliminary rounds. After the scores were totaled for the preliminary rounds the results were as follows for the finals:
Bronze Cup:
1st Carl L 
2nd Bob S
3rd Alfred
4th Larry
Silver Cup:
1st Brad
2nd Quan
3rd Glen
4th Steve M
Gold Cup:
1st Steve N
2nd Alex *
3rd Otto*
4th Urs*
The Silver and Bronze Cups went off without much drama but the gold cup was not so lucky. It started off with Urs watching the wrong plane when taking off resulting in 4 pilots watching 3 planes climb  out from take-off as they should but with a lone  plane having a low level adventure into the parking area( minor damage). Down to 3 planes…next I believe Otto flew so low a bush reached up and grabbed his plane —now  2 planes left—next Alex had something happen—I don’t recall what happened but it did not help his flight. The net result was at the end of 10 laps I was alone in first place. It sure would have been more fun if everyone had gone the full ten laps—there is always next time!  One takeaway from this story is that it makes sense to decorate your plane so as to avoid situations where you end up trying to fly the wrong model. Also note that if you don’t have racing numbers on your plane please get them installed. If you need a number email me with your  3 choices between one and 99( most of the numbers < 20 are already taken)
Next race day is Sept 10th at 10am. As usual visitors from other clubs are welcome to fly in our T28 races. 
Go fast and tun left!
Steve Neu

Electroglide Report for Aug 2022

By Scott Vance

The August Electroglide had 6 pilots brave the overcast skies and a stiff south wind all day.

Round 1 had all pilots launching from the north weed line in a south west direction to avoid flying over the pits.  It was a challenge for all to find wind lift.  In the Radian Class, Stephen had the longest flight with 4:41 and a 20 point landing.  Dennis had a 2:20 flight with a 30 point landing.  Alex got the Luckydog.

Round 2 again had Stephen with the longest flight at 2:23 with a 20 point landing.  Bob had 1:54 with a 20 point landing.  Alex got the Luckydog with a 20 point landing.  In the Open Class, Daric had a flight time of 1:52 with a 10 point landing.  Neil had a 1:40 flight with a 20 point landing.

Round 3 saw the wind increase as did flight times.  Bob had the longest flight time in the Radian Class, 2:41.  Alex had a flight time of 1:59 with a 30 point landing.  In the Open Class, Daric had a time of 3:26 with a 20 point landing.  Neil got the Luckydog and a 10 point landing.

Round 4 had Dennis with a time of 3:49 and a 10 point landing that he really had to work for.  Bob had a time of 2:29 with a perfect 30 point landing.  Alex had a time of 2:19 with a 10 point landing.  In the Open Class, Neil got the Luckydog and a 30 point landing.  Daric had the longest flight time of the day at 7:25.

The big winners for the day are Stephen in the Radian Class with 133 points and Neil in the Open Class with 138 points.  Congrats to all of today’s pilots for flying safely in very challenging conditions.

Chairman’s Corner for July – Aug 2022

Hello Folks, this month we had our event on July 2nd and I had to miss it, due to having Covid.  I will tell you this, it is not fun to experience. So, I won’t go into details.  And it took the whole month to get over it.  As of today, I tested Negative and have for over a couple of weeks now.   I still stayed home, just to be safe. But I did hear the 4th of July event went very well and the Tri-Tips Sandwiches were really good.  Thanks Jim, for putting together another successful contest together, glad all had a great time. 

I will see you all this coming Saturday for our July meeting and Jim has another great event planned for us.  “Altitude Quest”.  Closest to the target altitude wins.  Jim, of course, will have a lot more information to provide to us all on Saturday.     Our President, Steve Manganelli, will have some good information for us about our club in our monthly meeting.

Just a little reminder that I want to make sure everyone is up to date with TRUST and that you have your FAA # on your aircraft, Thank You all very much!

Since I was under the bug, and my new job, which has been cool so far.  I get to build engine cowls for Airbus, Boeing, and now, Gulfstream, though I was not able to get any construction on the DC-3.  I did however come across this:

Douglas DC-3 Flies Again After 13-Year Hiatus

The Air North C-47A conversion ‘Yukon Sourdough’ returned to service in its first step toward the airshow circuit.

With a bit of a crosswind at play, pilot Jim Sells and co-pilot Mike Macario climbed aboard Yukon Sourdough—a 1942 Douglas C-47A converted to a DC-3C. What lay ahead? The return to service flight of the airplane painted with a bold yellow-and-green livery—the colors of Air North in Canada—at the Hagerstown Regional Airport (KHGR) in Maryland.

The Douglas Gooney Bird hadn’t flown since 2009.

The Flight

The plan was to take the DC-3, N983DC, up for a short flight to test basic systems and the operation of its Pratt & Whitney R-1830-92 Twin Wasp engines. Everything went smoothly, according to Sells, and they stayed up a little bit longer than expected—about 40 minutes.

“We looked around for problems and we didn’t find any,” said Sells, save for an intermittent intercom. Macario, the group’s maintenance technician with inspection authority, wants to adjust the fuel pressures on the engines so they match, but that’s about it as far as squawks from the first flight after 13 years.

The aircraft is currently shepherded by owners Kent Casady, Malcolm Van Kirk, and Derek White—though White puts it well: “You never really own anything. You also can’t take anything materialistic with you when you die. We are just good stewards for Yukon Sourdough.

Though Macario’s typed in the airplane—and the team has worked on it consistently for the past four years—the group brought in Sells for the test flight and to help Macario and other pilots return to currency as well.

The History

The airplane was built at one of the Douglas Aircraft Company’s wartime production plants in Oklahoma City in 1942 for the U.S. Air Force, originally carrying U.S. Air Force No. 42-92464. The registration transferred over to the Canadian Air Force, where it flew as Dakota IIIU FZ675, then No. 960. Air North, a Canadian airline founded in 1977, operated scheduled service between the Yukon and Alaska, and the company purchased the airplane in 1982, registering it as CF-OVW, a Douglas DC3C-S1C3G. 

The airline painted on the DC-3’s distinctive tail art, for which it was christened Yukon Sourdough. It was sold in 1998, and its restoration was picked up by the Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA) in 2001. It was purchased from EAA by Stephen Van Kirk, Malcolm’s brother, before going to its current owners.

Once the airplane has been through its paces—and the pilots complete recurrent training—they intend to hit the airshow circuit with Yukon Sourdough as part of the D-Day Squadron’s participating aircraft.

In the meantime make sure you get all your equipment before heading down to the field, so you don’t have to go back home and grab the batteries!!!

Jovi Murek

Chairman